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Block Vote

Block Vote, also known as Multiple Non-Transferable Vote

Where is Block Vote used?

• London borough elections.
• Some county, Welsh unitary, English unitary and most English shire district authority elections.
• Local elections in Hungary and Slovenia.
• Polish local and senatorial elections
• Slovakian local and regional elections.
• National assembly elections in Lebanon and Mauritius,
• Senatorial elections in the Philippines.


How does Block Vote work?

The Block Vote is a voting system used in multi-member constituencies where voters can elect more than one representative in each constituency.

Voters can cast as many votes as there are available seats and the candidates with the most votes win, even if they have not managed to secure a majority of the votes.







Pros and Cons of the Block Vote

The case for

The arguments against

It is relatively simple for voters to understand.

It is very disproportional and enables the strongest party with a comfortable or narrow majority to take all the seats in the constituency

It encourages strong party organisation.

It encourages tactical voting. In order to avoid wasting votes on candidates who are certain to either win or lose, electors have an incentive to vote for candidates who have a realistic but not definite chance of winning.

 


Other voting systems by type

Proportional Representation
Party List PR
Single Transferable Vote

Mixed Systems 
Additional Member System
Alternative Vote Plus

Majoritarian Systems
Alternative Vote
Block Vote
Borda Count
First Past The Post
Limited Vote
Supplementary Vote
Two-Round System

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